Past Members

Past HAC Lab Members

Jeanira Molina- Visiting MSc Student

Email: j.molina@student.maastrichtuniversity.nl

 

In 2016, I obtained my Bachelor in Psychology at VU University Amsterdam. During my Bachelor, I decided to study abroad at the University of Georgia (USA). My curriculum at UGA consisted of a variety of courses such as: “Drug and Alcohol Abuse”, “Social Control of Crime”, and “Abnormal Psychology”. In 2017, I was accepted into the master programme ‘Forensic Psychology’ at Maastricht University.

 

I joined the HAC lab in 2017 as a Masters student doing my research internship at the University of Portsmouth. Supervised by Prof. Lorraine Hope and co-supervised by final year PhD student, Aleksandras Izotovas, I am conducting research on fantasy proneness and verbal lie detection tools. In specific, I am investigating whether verbal lie detection tools can accurately detect deception in highly fantasy prone individuals. Other areas within Forensic Psychology I am interested in are: eyewitnesses, young, and female offenders.

 

Koen Baltussen- Visiting MSc Student

Email: k.baltussen@student.maastrichtuniversity.nl

In 2016, I received my BA (Hons) in Liberal Arts and Sciences at University College Roosevelt in Middelburg, the Netherlands. I majored in Psychology and in Law, and I did a minor in Statistics. During my time in Middelburg, I have been involved in many different fields of research. My most memorable project included researching coping skills of high-risk psychiatric ward nurses. For my Bachelor's thesis, I developed an assessment tool for cognitive decline in elderly people, in the form of an interactive board game.

 

In 2016, I started a Master's degree in Forensic Psychology at the University of Maastricht. My main interests in the field of forensic psychology are interpersonal violence on wards, as well as violence risk assessment and management. I am also interested in psychodiagnostics, and (diagnostic) interviewing techniques. I am currently involved with HAC as a visiting research intern, as a part of the Master's degree. At HAC, I conduct research into the dimensional composition of investigative interviewers' attitudes, and the relationship between interviewer attitude and interviewer behaviour. For this study, I work together with Alejandra De La Fuente Vilar. The study is supervised by Prof. Lorraine Hope at the University of Portsmouth, and Prof. Marko Jelicic at the University of Maastricht.

 

Maren Lennartz - Visiting MSc Student

Email: m.lennartz@student.maastrichtuniversity.nl

 

In 2016, I graduated from Maastricht University (The Netherlands) with a BSc in Psychology and started the Master’s program in Forensic Psychology in Maastricht the same year. I am now in my second year of the Masters and as part of the program, I am a visiting research intern at the University of Portsmouth from September to February. My supervisors are Prof Lorraine Hope in Portsmouth and Dr Melanie Sauerland in Maastricht. I collaborate with Renan Benigno (PhD candidate) on a study on the influence of individual differences (i.e. metamemory realism and need for cognition) on susceptibility to co-witness’ misinformation. Before the current internship, I was an intern in the secured ward of a psychiatric hospital and a prison with focus on cognitive behavioural and schema therapy.

 

Nina Tupper - Erasmus Mundus PhD Student

Email: nina.tupper@maastrichtuniversity.nl

 

I obtained my BA in Psychology from Bates College (Maine, USA) in 2014. While at Bates, I worked as a research assistant with Prof. Amy Bradfield Douglass and completed an empirical thesis on eyewitness memory and the Post-Identification Feedback Effect.

 

I started my PhD in September 2014 on the Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate program of Legal Psychology. While I am based primarily at Maastricht University in the Netherlands (supervised by Dr. Melanie Sauerland and Prof. Harald Merckelbach), I also work in collaboration with the University of Portsmouth (supervised by Prof. Lorraine Hope, Prof. Aldert Vrij, and Dr. James Sauer [now University of Tasmania]). In my second year, I visited UoP for six months, during which time I continued my research with HAC lab.

 

I am interested in examining factors that influence eyewitness memory, recognition, and identification decisions. I am currently conducting research on identification in the context of multiple perpetrator crimes.

 

Click here for publications and presentations.

 

Deeb - Erasmus Mundus PhD Student

Email: haneen.deeb@port.ac.uk

 

I hold BA (2005) and MA (2012) degrees in Psychology from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon. My MA project addressed the impact of interviewers’ feedback on eyewitness identification decisions. In September 2014, I joined the Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate Programme (EMJD) in Legal Psychology. I am based at the University of Portsmouth where I am supervised by Prof. Aldert Vrij, Prof. Lorraine Hope, and Dr. Samantha Mann. As part of the Programme, I am also hosted by the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) where I work with Prof. Pär-Anders Granhag and Prof. Leif Strömwall. My thesis project examines various interviewing techniques that may be employed in forensic contexts to detect deceptive suspects. I am particularly interested in how different statement consistencies (within-statement, between-statement, within-pair, and statement-evidence consistencies) may be used as cues to deceit.

 

Shannan Greaney - Forensic MSc Student

Email: shannan.greaney@myport.ac.uk

 

I obtained my Bachelor of Science in Forensic Psychology in 2014 at the University of Portsmouth, UK. During that time I conducted research under the supervision of Dr James Sauer (University of Tasmania, Australia) investigating the role of divided attention on eyewitness memory and confidence. Since then I have been volunteering as a Special Constable in Hertfordshire, UK, and I returned to the University of Portsmouth, UK in 2015 to start my Masters in Forensic Psychology. I am highly interested in a variety of areas within Forensic Psychology, but my main research focus is within eyewitness memory. My current research is investigating the effect of divided attention on the memory of operational witnesses such as Police Officers. I am conducting this research under the supervision of Professor Lorraine Hope (University of Portsmouth, UK) and Dr James Sauer (University of Tasmania, Australia) as an external supervisor.

 

Andrew Clark - Erasmus Mundus PhD Student

andrew.clark1@port.ac.uk

 

I obtained both my Bachelors (2010) and Masters (2012) Degrees from the University of Hull in the UK. During these studies I worked with Professor Giuliana Mazzoni on a number of research projects which included research on false memories and nonbelieved memories. As a research assistant with Professor Mazzoni (2012-2013) I worked on research which focused on Hyperthymesia. More recently (2013) I worked in with Professor Amina Memon at Royal Holloway, University of London. Together with Dr Alan Scoboria (University of Windsor, Canada) we worked on a number of research projects examining nonbelieved memories.

 

I joined the Hope Applied Cognition Lab in September 2013 when I started my PhD on the Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctoral programme in Legal Psychology. The main focus of my research is on the consequences of nonbelieved memories. I am currently examining whether nonbeliveved memories result in memory omissions. I am supervised by Professor Lorraine Hope and Dr James Ost at the University of Portsmouth, and Dr James Sauer (University of Tasmania, Australia) as an external supervisor. I am also supervised by Dr Henry Otgaar at Maastricht University where I spent six months (September 2014-February 2015).

 

Click here for publications and presentations.

 

Joanne Rechdan - Erasmus Mundus PhD Student

Email: joanne.rechdan@port.ac.uk

 

I hold a BA in Psychology with distinction from the American University of Beirut (2009), with minors in Cognitive Science and Creative Writing. In 2011, I was awarded an Mphil in Social & Developmental Psychology from the University of Cambridge. Subsequently, I returned to Beirut (LB) to teach Psychology at my alma-mater, before my yearning for student life eventually caught up with me. Presently, I am part of the Erasmus-Mundus Joint Doctorate in Legal Psychology program at the University of Portsmouth (UK), Maastricht University (NL), and the University of Gothenburg (SWE) [House of Legal Psychology Consortium]. The program is an idyllic combination of my two greatest passions: Psychology and travel.

 

I am fascinated by many areas of Psychology, and hope to have a career coloured by varied explorations within the discipline. The focus of my doctoral thesis is the Effect of Social Influence on Metacognitive Monitoring and Control Processes in Eyewitness Memory Reports. I am supervised by Professor Lorraine Hope and Dr James Ost at the University of Portsmouth, and also by Dr James Sauer (University of Tasmania) as an external supervisor. I also have supervisors at Maastricht University where I am currently spending six months (September 2014-February 2015) working with Professor Harald Merckelbach and Dr Melanie Sauerland.

 

Click here for publications and presentations.

 

Rosa Pedrero Núñez - Visiting MSc, The Netherlands

 

In July 2014 I graduated in Psychology from the University of Seville, Spain. During my fourth year of my Bachelors, I studied at the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) for 10 months as an Erasmus exchange student. Currently, I am taking part in a 2-year Masters programme in Forensic Psychology at Maastricht University, The Netherlands. As part of my second year of the programme, I am a visiting research intern for six months at the University of Portsmouth under the supervision of Prof. Lorraine Hope. I collaborate with Andrew Clark on a project that evaluates whether people can be induced to stop believing in memories for true experiences and its consequences on memory report.

 

Luciano Haussen Pinto - Visiting PhD Student, PUCRS Brazil

 

I am Psychologist and graduated from Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS). I also hold a Maste

of Human Cognition from PUCRS and a Specialization in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy from WP in Brazil.

Currently, I am doing my PhD investigating the subject Eyewitness Testimony in PUCRS as well under the

supervision of Prof. Lilian Stein. At the moment I am a visitor student in the University of Porstmouth for six

months under the supervision of Prof. Lorraine Hope. In Brazil I am Professor in the Faculty of Development of Rio Grande do Sul – FADERGS (belonging to the Laureate International Universities). I have some experience as a Psychotherapist (private practice). Before Psychology, I obtained a degree in Advertising. I have interest in the fields of Cognitive Processes (mainly Memory and False Memories), Forensic Psychology, Cognitive Therapies, Psychopathologies and Neurosciences.

 

Ailsa Millen - PhD Student, Departmental Bursary

 

In 2003 I graduated from The University of Stirling with a First Class Bsc (Hons) in Psychology and The Alan Baddeley Award for best final year project. My doctoral research explores the development of novel approaches to the detecting ‘concealed face recognition’ (CFR), with a particular focus on eye movements when lying about recognition. Using an Eye Movement-based Concealed Knowledge Test (EM-CKT), I study changes in eye movement behaviour when both lying and telling the truth about recognising different types of familiar faces. My research is framed around cognitive load theory of deception (Vrij et al, 2006) and the role of meta-cognitive processes when attempting to strategically monitor and control our behaviour when lying (Koriat & Goldsmith, 1996). It also incorporates research on involuntary and memory-based eye movements to familiar/relevant faces (Hannula and Ranganath, 2009).

 

Maria Andrea Ramirez Tobon - Visiting Intern

 

I am a final year Psychology student from Eafit University in Medellin, Colombia. I am enrolled on an internship in the Hope Applied Cognition Lab at the University of Portsmouth (February-July 2015) working as a research assistant, and supervised by Professor Lorraine Hope. Currently I am working with Andrew Clark on a project examining the consequences of nonbelieved memories, examining if nonbelieved memories result in memory omissions. I am also working with Joanne Rechdan examining the effect of social influence on metacognitive monitoring and control processes in eyewitness memory reports.

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